Mary Wollstonecraft's image projected onto the side of the British Houses of Parliament

Mary Wollstonecraft’s image projected onto the side of the British Houses of Parliament

Mary Wollstonecraft has always been a figure of interest. An eighteenth-century British writer, philosopher, and advocate of women’s rights, she stirred up controversy through her beliefs and choices during her lifetime and beyond. Unconventional relationships, radical views on marriage and the status of women, as well as published works that challenged the society in which she existed, were some of the ways she riled the minds of those around her.

During her brief career, she wrote novels, treatises, a travel narrative, a history of the French Revolution, a conduct book, and a children’s book. Wollstonecraft is best known for A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (1792), in which she argues that women are not naturally inferior to men, but appear to be only because they lack education. She suggests that both men and women should be treated as rational beings and imagines a social order founded on reason. [Wikipedia]

Now there is an effort to recognize Wollstonecraft by erecting a statue of her, and last week, in order to raise awareness (and funds), her image was projected onto the side of the British Houses of Parliament.

She has been called the mother of British feminism, so it is perhaps fitting that her image was blasted onto the building known in some parts as the mother of all parliamentsMary Wollstonecraft‘s image was projected onto the Palace of Westminster during Wednesday’s rush hour to raise money for another image – the first ever statue of the author of the Vindication of the Rights of Women.

Campaigners are aiming to raise £240,000 to pay for the statuary on Newington Green, in north London, near the site of Wollstonecraft’s former home and the school where the radical 18th-century campaigner taught. They also spent two hours handing out leaflets and promoting the fact that 77 supportive MPs have already signed a petition, including Jeremy Corbyn MP, who masterminded the turning out of the lights overlooking the Thames. [The Guardian]

Check out the full article at The Guardian.